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Reward offered for vandalism tip


According to the National Park Service investigation, two sets of footprints were found along the edge of the fence line that extended from the dunes to the waters edge. No footprints or tire tracks were observed entering the closed area which was established to protect a least tern colony; no birds appeared to have been disturbed during the act of vandalism.

A recent court approved Consent Degree requires the National Park Service to automatically expand the closure area by 50 meters where a confirmed deliberate act disturbs or harasses wildlife or vandalizes fencing, nests, or plants. The vandal(s) action leading to the subsequent enclosure enlargement have not caused harm to the birds but have caused additional harm to the businesses and ORV community recreating and fishing at Cape Hatteras!

Anyone having information please contact:

  • United Four Wheel Drive Association (UFWDA)
    (757) 546-7969
  • BlueRibbon Coalition (BRC)
    (208) 237-1008

Each person submitting a tip will receive a code number for them to use in tracking the status of their tip. Tips made to UFWDA or BRC can be made anonymously, no caller ID is used and caller need not identify themselves.

Or, contact Ranger Davis Carter of the National Parks Service, at 252-475-8326, P.O. Box 190, Buxton, NC 27920

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John Stewart

RECREATION GROUPS RESPOND TO THREATS TO MOTORIZED RECREATION IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA FORESTS LAWSUIT

The Recreation Groups filed a motion to intervene on May 15th in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California (Case No. C 08-1185-MHP). The groups petitioning the court include the California Association of Four Wheel Drive Clubs, American Motorcyclist Association District 36, California Enduro Riders Association, and the BlueRibbon Coalition,.

"Once again, the motorized recreation community have little choice but to respond to attempts to close treasured access to historical roads in these 'roadless' areas," said Don Spuhler, Cal4 President. "Apparently high levels of State leadership are dissatisfied by the prospect that these routes continue in use despite the Clinton Roadless Rule and unprecedented Forest Service travel management efforts. We believe it essential to defend this access and proper understanding of the forest planning process," Spuhler concluded.

The Motion to Intervene is presently scheduled to be heard on June 30, 2008.

# # #

The California Association of 4 Wheel Drive Clubs is a California nonprofit organization actively promoting conservation and responsible vehicle-oriented recreation. The Association represents over 8,000 members and 160 member clubs. 1-800-4x4-FUNN. www.cal4wheel.com

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John Stewart

California Call to Action: Two Anti-Gun Bills are Expected to be Heard Next Tuesday

English: Top half is the assembled magazine wi...

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Contact members of the Assembly Public Safety Committee Today

On Tuesday, April 2, the Assembly Committee on Public Safety will consider two drastic and sweeping restrictions on the sale of lawful firearms and ammunition in California.

Assembly Bill 48 (Skinner), would ban the sale of magazine parts kits that can hold more than ten cartridges, it would ban the sale or transfer of ammunition by anyone other than a licensed firearms dealer and would require that every single ammunition transfer be reported to the state.  Under this unprecedented attack on ammunition, millions of law-abiding gun owners would become criminals.

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John Stewart

Money, Quality, Jobs

After reading the below press release, I was struck by the seemingly diametrically opposed views.  While hunters and anglers believe it is important to buy "Made in America"; they seem to draw the line when it comes to the cost difference.  While they want "Made in America", they are not willing to pay what it takes to have "Made in America".  Quality is not cheap. But, neither is life in America...

“Made in U.S.A.” Makes a Difference to Sportsmen, but Price Still a Big Factor

FERNANDINA BEACH, FL — When HunterSurvey.com and AnglerSurvey.com sought to determine how much weight the “Made in U.S.A.” tag carried with sportsmen when making purchases of outdoor equipment, they found most respondents agreed that U.S.-made products were of better quality and it was important to buy them. They also discovered there is only but so much most hunters and anglers are willing to pay for that label.

When asked how important it is to buy fishing tackle or hunting equipment that is made in the U.S.A. nearly 89 percent of anglers said it was very or somewhat important, while 94 percent of hunters said it was very or somewhat important. At the same time, 47 percent of those anglers feel U.S.-made tackle is generally better in quality and 63 percent of hunters believe U.S.-made hunting gear is better than equipment made overseas.

So how much more are sportsmen willing to pay to support American jobs? If the “Made in U.S.A.” product is five percent or less in cost, 85 percent of anglers and 89 percent of hunters report will buy the American-made product. But after that, numbers begin to drop sharply, and once the U.S. product exceeds 20 to 30 percent in cost, only 34 percent of anglers and 36 percent of hunters say they are willing to pay the difference.

“All things being equal, sportsmen appreciate American quality and are certainly eager to support American jobs; however, it doesn’t take much of a price difference before economic realities set in and hunters and anglers are forced to make important decisions about how much they will spend,’” said Rob Southwick, president of Southwick Associates, which designs and conducts the surveys at HunterSurvey.com and AnglerSurvey.com. “There is a reason why imported products take up so much retail space. Hunters and anglers, like all other consumers, want to get more for their limited dollars. As long as U.S. production costs remain high, whether related to taxes or other factors, imported products will continue to own a large share of the U.S. market.”

To help continually improve, protect and advance the shooting sports and outdoor recreation, all sportsmen and sportswomen are encouraged to participate in the surveys at HunterSurvey.com, ShooterSurvey.com and/or AnglerSurvey.com. Each month, participants who complete the survey are entered into a drawing for one of five $100 gift certificates to the sporting goods retailer of their choice.

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John Stewart

Solar power plants burden the counties that host them

The "gift horse" of economic income to counties from siting of solar energy projects appears to be a tired horse ready for retirement.  The below article from the LA Times notes "Eager for jobs and tax money, Mojave Desert counties welcomed big solar projects. But they may have been too optimistic. And expanding emergency services and infrastructure isn't cheap."

While companies will reap profits, taxpayers and rate payers will be footing the bill for many years to come...

By Julie Cart, Los Angeles Times,  November 25, 2012 - Solar power plants burden the counties that host them Eager for jobs and tax money, Mojave Desert counties welcomed big solar projects. But they may have been too optimistic. And expanding emergency services and infrastructure isn't cheap. When it comes to attracting business to California's eastern deserts, Inyo County is none too choosy.

Since the 19th century the sparsely populated county has worked to attract industries shunned by others, including gold, tungsten and salt mining. The message: Your business may be messy, but if you plan to hire our residents, the welcome mat is out.

So the county grew giddy last year as it began to consider hosting a huge, clean industry. BrightSource Energy, developer of the proposed $2.7-billion Hidden Hills solar power plant 230 miles northeast of Los Angeles, promised a bounty of jobs and a windfall in tax receipts. In a county that issued just six building permits in 2011, Inyo officials first estimated that property taxes from the facility would boost the general fund 17%.

But upon closer inspection, the picture didn't seem so rosy.

An economic consultant hired by the county found that property tax revenue would be a fraction of the customary amount because portions of the plant qualifiy for a solar tax exclusion. Fewer than 10 local workers would land permanent positions — and just 5% of the construction jobs would be filled by county residents. And construction workers are likely to spend their money across the nearby state line, in Nevada.

Worse, the project would cost the county $11 million to $12 million during the 30-month construction phase, with much of the money going to upgrade a historic two-lane road to the plant. Once the plant begins operation, the county estimates taxpayers will foot the bill for nearly $2 million a year in additional public safety and other services.

Two of California's other Mojave Desert counties, Riverside and San Bernardino, have made similar discoveries. Like Inyo, they are now pushing back against solar developers, asking them to cover the costs of servicing the new industry.

Source: Los Angles Times

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